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After a genocide event in the 70’s, the Tapayuna people were reduced to 41 survivors, which listed them as virtually extinct as an autonomous culture.

They were relocated to the Xingu basin to live along with culturally close ethnic groups such as the Kisedje and the Kaiapos. They exaggeratedly absorbed new customs and the lasting contact put the Tapayuna people at risk of becoming victims of ethnocide within the Brazilian Indigenous Park itself. 

In this series, the images tell about their bond with the land, they tell about how their lives revolve around the river. The fish is presented as a metaphor to the connection they have with the traditional territory, the Arinos River, to where they hope they will be back to preserve what is left of the Tapayuna culture.

The Tapayunas are one of many indigenous peoples who experienced genocide fighting against agricultural expansion in Brazil.